Online resources and links

We’ve been to each of the websites below and like them. Included in our list are great sites with advice for writers covering everything from grammar to social-networking tips and a whole bevy of places where you’ll find publishing news and other matters of interest for independent authors. If you have favorites you think we should add, send us an email at info@blueinkreview.com and we’ll check out your suggestion.

Writing help

The sites listed here are a selection of the soup-to-nuts writing advice now available to writers. There are plenty more to choose from, and many are fabulous, we’re sure. This is only a small selection, and we always welcome your input for more. From grammar help to book-cover inspiration, these are sites that you won’t want to miss when you’re in the process of writing your book:

  • Grammar Girl: This grammar wiz can help you solve just about any grammar puzzle you’re facing. And she does so in a fun, conversational style that makes grammar more entertainment than chore.
  • Book Cover Archive: Unfortunately books are judged by covers, so get yourself educated on the current trends in covers here.
  • Writers Digest: This site has become a mammoth hub with writer communities, blogs, classes…and more. Poke around here for a while and you’ll find just about anything you’re looking for.
  • The Writer: A great source for advice, this magazine site should be on everyone’s visiting list.
  • Independent Book Publishers Association: A national source of support and information for independent authors.
  • Daily Writing Tips: Get your daily fix with topics ranging from grammar to punctuation, from spelling to usage and vocabulary. And, the archives are invaluable.
  • The Center for Writing Studies at the University of Illinois can clear up even the most technical questions you might have.  Last stop for the mechanics of writing.

Marketing advice

If only writing “the end” was the last of it, author life would seem easy. But a whole new job awaits authors once their book is published, with marketing, publicizing and selling. Here are some sites we think might be useful as you start this phase:

  • Authortechtips will get you up and running with everything from podcasts to social networking to blogging. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the technology, start here!
  • Seth Godin’s blog should be a stop for any self-published author in the marketing phase. This guru will give you great advice and inspire you to really get out there.
  • Michael Hyatt is a pro in the publishing business and his advice to first-time authors should be on everyone’s reading list.
  • A Book Inside has great publishing and marketing tips from author Carol Denbow.
  • Pimp my Novel offers publishing-insider Eric Blank’s creative ideas about promotion.
  • The Book Designer has a collection of over 700 authoritative and easy to understand articles which have helped guide thousands of authors through the publishing process.

Industry news and community

There are lots of great blogs and communities for independent publishers. Here are a few that we’ve found and like:

  • Self Publishing Resources has a blog for self-publishers by self-publishing guru Sue Collier. It also has links to numerous sites that are useful
  • Publetariat is a great online community directed specifically to self-publishers.
  • Chris Guillebeau has useful advice based on his own publishing success, and his 279 Days to Overnight Success makes this worth the visit.
  • JA Konrath writes a blog about his own self-publishing process. He’s a bestselling thriller writer and his “newbies guide to self-publishing” will give you lots of inspiration.
  • Writer Beware exposes the problems and pitfalls that face aspiring writers.

Online book clubs

In addition to all the great sites already mentioned, we thought we’d add a few book club sites that skew toward traditionally published books. (But everything is changing very quickly in this new world of the ebook, so perhaps it’s just a matter of time before self-published titles will be a big part of the mix.)

  • Goodreads: Get recommendations, keep track of your books, form a book club.
  • Library Thing: Catalog your own reading habits and wishes here.
  • Daily Lit Bite-size installments of books sent on your own schedule for all of us overworked, over-scheduled readers.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone