Eden

Eve Langford

AuthorHouse, 296 pages, (paperback) $15.49, 9781449019525
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Eden: The Buried Treasure is an ambitious book looking to shed light on the story of Adam and Eve through the lens of modern feminist theology. Tracing the tale’s origins back to the Epic of Gilgamesh–written, by some approximations, 400 years before the Old Testament story–author Eve Wood-Langford argues that the Eden myth has been […]

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Walking Through Walls and Other Improbabilities

Milton E. Brener

Xlibris, 305 pages, (paperback) $19.99, 9781462881123
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

In his second book concerning UFOs (the first was Our Interplanetary Future, 2009), Milton Brener examines a plethora of evidence in order to hypothesize answers to two questions about the alien presence and alien abduction: Why are they here? And what makes Earth worth the bother for these vastly superior beings (notice the plural here, […]

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The Childhood of Jesus in Twelve Years: How It Affects Your Child and Your Parental Responsibility

Sophia Willaim

AuthorHouse, 148 pages, (paperback) $18.73, 9781467001786
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

“Jesus was a child just like your child. His parents, Mary and Joseph, were parents just like us,” writes Sophia William. She adds, “I would recommend that every parent imitate Mary and Joseph’s style of parenting.”

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What Makes People Tick and Why

Naomi Tickle

Xlibris, 266 pages, (paperback) $19.99, 9781465399519
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Imagine if a flared eyebrow or pointed chin could tell you which careers best suit you, how to avoid fights with your partner and what makes your child happiest.

Naomi Tickle’s book does all that and more through a comprehensive examination of the 2,700-year-old Chinese art of physiognomy, or study of the face. Tickle, a […]

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The Wager Nobody Cared to Win

Victor M. Calderon

Xlibris, 356 pages, (paperback) $19.99, 9781465368980
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Victor M. Calderon’s memoir, The Wager Nobody Cared to Win: My Life with ADHD, has occasional moments of relevance, but is largely over-shadowed by extraneous detail and inconsistencies.

Calderon recounts disjointed episodes from his childhood in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, his experiences in the U.S. Army, and his tenure as an agent for the U.S. Customs […]

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Those Crazy Camera Guys

Ken Bumpus

Trafford, NULL pages, (paperback) $13.14, 9781466906235
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Ken Bumpus, a retired U.S. Navy officer and photographer who spent three tours of duty in Vietnam, has written a novel about a way of life he knew well. The protagonist is Buster Brady, senior chief photographer’s mate, and the setting is the Vietnam War. The other major characters are the photographers he commands. They […]

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Origin of the Arabic Numerals: A Natural History of Numbers

Adel S. Bishtawi

AuthorHouse, 359 pages, (paperback) $18.73, 9781456785864
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Born in Nazareth, Palestine, Adel S. Bishtawi has published short stories, novels, histories, and hundreds of articles and interviews in Arabic and English. In addition to printed material, his resume includes TV documentaries. Origin of the Arabic Numerals is a scholarly attempt to trace the numerals back to ancient hand and finger signs.

Along with […]

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Tales of a Hollywood Housewife

Betty Marvin

iUniverse, 318 pages, (hardcover) $32.95, 9781440198298
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Betty Marvin was married to Lee Marvin from the start of his career as a struggling actor in Hollywood to his triumph in Cat Ballou (1965). In his company, she met Walter Matthau, Simone Signoret, John Wayne and many other stars. In her new memoir, Tales of a Hollywood Housewife, she provides vivid glimpses of […]

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Keep Getting Up

Ann L. Stanford

Xlibris, 530 pages, (paperback) $23.99, 9781436309523
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

This compelling memoir recounts author Ann Stanford’s incredible journey from childhood in a one-room shack in Kansas to a remarkable diplomatic career, culminating in heading the American Consulate General in Lyon, France, the first African-American woman to hold this position.

Along the way, she details the challenges she had to face, primarily racism and discrimination. […]

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They Called Me the Cat

Margaret Routcliffe

Trafford, 336 pages, (paperback) $25.45 Can., 9781425178932
(Reviewed: January, 2012)

Born during a full moon on Friday the 13th, the protagonist in Margaret Routcliffe’s novel is destined to become a force in the world as she develops cat-like survival instincts that keep her moving forward, despite numerous near-death experiences.

A child from a small town in Maine, seven-year-old Stephanie McConnell is sent to live with […]

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